Blog action day

As apart of my support for WalkFree.Org, is today’s call to action. If you’re able to read this, then I can say that everyday we live our lives happily and comfortably. We wake up, have a nice breakfast, get dressed in nice clothes, take safe and nice public transport, and then go to a nice job or university to work or study. The people around us are nice, cooperative and respectful. However, that is true if you’re able to read this. You’re probably reading this on your smartphone or computer, two devices that are ubiquitous for rich people. Actually, according to WalkFree.Org, 28 million people globally are enslaved, about 80,000 people in Japan are enslaved. Most of these enslaved are probably factory workers under Prime Minister Abe’s foreign worker training programme, women brought to Japan as “entertainers”, and even Japanese women brought into via the hostess industry. These people lack the freedom to communicate to friends or family, and are forced to work, packing boxes, making clothes, packing food, many things that make your life nice and comfortable. They get little or no salary. These people work here in Japan, and in every country around the world.

Blog Action Day 2014.

Blog Action Day 2014.

Does this really affect you? Do you like to go shopping at Zara? Do you have a Nintendo? Zara sources its cotton from Uzbek slaves. Nintendo uses minerals to make its devices from slave labour mines. And remember, slaves that make some of your clothes, electronic devices, and other things, can be as young as 6 years old. Learn more here, WalkFree.Org.

People protesting against Zara.

People protesting against Zara.

No welfare for Permanent Residents in Japan

This matter is so vitally important for so many reasons. Permanent Resident is an official visa status. Being a Permanent Resident allows a person to take out bank loans, have credit cards, live independently, seek work independently, and all the legal benefits of a Japanese citizens, but they are not allowed to vote. Even though Permanent Residents pay taxes, contribute to the welfare and benefit of Japan, Permanent Residents cannot choose who to democratically represent them. However, here is this court ruling that will have serious repercussions, I’m sure. The Japan Times reports that Permanent Residents are no eligible for welfare benefits, even if they are retired and poor, and paid a lifetime of taxes to this country, they are effectively discarded (Japan Times). The repercussions are that long-term experts will be discouraged from staying, which affects Japanese company’s abilities to recruit experts that are not locally available. It also means that people like me, education experts, should in fact be looking for permanent work in any other country but here. That means, only inexperienced young people will remain, but other countries will benefit from having experienced and highly knowledgeable experts. It also means that as Japan’s populations shrink, it will not be able to effectively recruit anyone who can stay in the country to take care of the elderly in nursing homes. Oh well. Japan is allowed to ruin it’s future if it wants. It sadly seems that the supreme court has not taken into consideration human rights issues, moral issues, nor a long term view and repercussions of its decision.