Introduction to Qualitative Data Analysis

For Nagoya based teachers, researchers, and JALT members, please tell us when the best time for you to attend Nagoya JALT meetings at this survey: https://goo.gl/forms/3ThnWjA8VkXQNIFm2.

This abstract was originally posted at the Nagoya JALT website. This page contains the workshop blurb and support materials. Thanks to all those who came, and QSR International Japan for sponsoring the main workshop by Prof. Yuzo Kimura.

How to do simple qualitative data analysis for small research projects on paper

  • Andrew Blyth
  • B.Sc, CELTA, MA.ELT, PhD (Ed; candidate)
  • University of Canberra, and Nanzan University

This is a simple introduction to qualitative data analysis for professional development for novice researchers, and for those wanting a better understanding of the research process. This workshop teaches and practices basic concepts of data analysis, coding (categorising), and basic concepts of theory making. The workshop is ideal for very small projects. Also, acquiring the fundamentals for larger projects including interview based research, classroom observations, discourse analysis, ethnography, and more. Furthermore, it provides the basic principles for understanding the next workshop which focuses on using Nvivo for qualitative research. Participants are not required to bring any particular materials or equipment for this workshop.

Support materials

References

  • Creswell, J (2009) Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. California, USA: Sage Publications.
  • Dörnyei, Z. (2007) Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Oxford Applied Linguistics). Oxford University Press.
  • Henrich, N. & Holmes, B. (2013). Web news readers’ comments: Towards developing a methodology for using on-line comments in social inquiry. Journal of Media and Communication Studies, 5(1).
  • Miles, M., and Huberman, A. (1994) An Expanded Sourcebook: Qualitative Data Analysis (2nd Edition). Thousand Oaks, USA: Sage Publications.
  • ›Mitchell, C. (2011) Doing Visual Researching. Sage Publications.

Introduction to qualitative research analysis for teachers 13th May

This weekend I’ll be doing a presentation / workshop for beginning researchers on qualitative research analysis. The aim is to provide a very simple, interesting introduction on what and how qualitative research analysis is done. Basic details are below, and full details are on the Nagoya JALT website. This event is sponsored by Nagoya JALT and QSR International.

Professional development: Qualitative research, data analysis methodology, and introduction to QSR Nvivo
At Nanzan University, R building, room: R52.
Map: https://goo.gl/maps/4wHsuUg86dK2
***Car parking is available in the new west carpark, close to R building.***

Schedule

  • 2:00 PM – Room opens, and Nvivo computer help available.
  • 2:30-3:30 – How to do simple qualitative data analysis for small projects on paper; Andrew Blyth, Nanzan University and University of Canberra.
  • 3:30-4:00 – Break + Nvivo computer help available.
  • 4:00-6:00 – Exploring qualitative data with NVivo: Creating, importing, coding and querying, Yuzo Kimura, University of Toyama.
  • 6:00-6:30 – Informal discussions and clean up.

The aim of these two workshops is for novice researchers to further develop and enhance their skills. There are two parts; first is a review of basic skills and an introduction to qualitative data analysis methodology; and the second introduces industry standard software commonly used in research projects.

People meeting, by Eric Bailey 2014, CC https://www.pexels.com/photo/people-meeting-workspace-team-7097/

People meeting, by Eric Bailey 2014, CC https://www.pexels.com/photo/people-meeting-workspace-team-7097/

Participants are not required to bring a laptop nor do they need to have Nvivo software, but can watch the demonstration. If they wish, participants can install QSR Nvivo on their laptops for the second workshop; however, it must be installed before attending, and the 14 day trial license newly activated. Detailed instructions are provided below. Any issues or problems with Nvivo installation should be resolved before the workshops, as the presenter cannot assist during his presentation time.

Finally, this is the first co-hosted workshop between Nagoya JALT and LEARN. A special thanks to Robert Croker of LEARN for the room booking, and for obtaining guest wifi access for this special event. Nagoya JALT looks forward to meeting and working with LEARN members at this and future events. Prof. Kimura’s workshop is co-sponsored with QSR International.

Workshop: Using Bottom-Up Approaches to Teach Listening

IMPORTANT UPDATE:

Due to sudden family emergency, I had to return home, and cannot give this presentation. However, I am eager to give this workshop to your group, office, chapter, etc if requested.

I will be presenting a workshop titled “Using Bottom-Up Approaches to Teach Listening” at the annual Japan Association of Language Teachers (JALT) conference in November this year. I encourage you to come along, or ask questions online (via Twitter is best). Official details:

Conference: Japan Association of Langauge Teachers (JALT) 2016 conference, http://jalt.org/conference.

  • Event: 42nd Annual International Conference on Language Teaching and Learning & Educational Materials Exhibition
  • Where: Aichi Industry & Labor Center – WINC Aichi, Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture, Japan
  • When: 25 – 28 November 2016
  • Theme: Transformation in Language Education

Day: Sunday, November 27th. CANCELLED (see above)
Time: 1:05 PM – 1:30 PM  (25 minutes).
Room: 904.

Presentation ID #: 619
Presentation Title: Using Bottom-Up Approaches to Teach Listening
Format: Practice-Oriented Short Workshop
Content Area: Listening (LIS)
Context: College & University Education

Handouts / resources:

(to be added later)

 

Long abstract:

Often teachers teach listening by playing a CD and providing students with comprehension questions; though this is not teaching listening but testing it (Sheerin, 1987). Also, recent academic discussion has criticised the inadequacy of listening strategies (see Blyth, 2012; and Chang and Millet, 2014). Consequently, new methodologies were developed by the presenter to actually teach listening using bottom-up approaches based on cognitive science theory by Cutler (2012) and Field (2008). This practice oriented workshop introduces these new teaching methodologies which are the outcomes of a large scale mixed methods research project. This project worked with teachers in central Japan to develop and trial methodologies for bottom-up listening approaches that are suitable for their context (considering teaching preferences, class types, and students). Data collection included pre and post listening tests, as well as interviews with teachers and students. A key result is that bottom-up listening approaches, or teaching pronunciation, is an effective means to improve student listening abilities. This workshop will provide only a brief introduction to pertinent listening theory followed by demonstrations of simple activities that teachers can use from Monday morning. The workshop will include demonstrations, audience participation, and a short Q&A. Handouts will include web links to class handouts, audio samples, demonstration videos, and other related materials.

Managing Stress

Stress is a normal part of life. Having too much and too little is damaging. We need to have a work-life balance to live normally. This means we need about a third (⅓) of the day work, ⅓ play (family & friends), and ⅓ sleep. If this balance is different, then you will have problems managing stress. This presentation is a brief introduction to stress and how to manage it. This presentation was given at the annual meeting of Aichi Gogaku Volunteers on the 18th June 2016.

Presentation slides & notes: Stress Managing in everyday life.pdf.

CC0 Startup Stock Photos 2014, from https://www.pexels.com/photo/notes-macbook-study-conference-7102/.

CC0 Startup Stock Photos 2014, from https://www.pexels.com/photo/notes-macbook-study-conference-7102/.

What is stress? Selye was a famous psychologist who studied stress. He said:

“Nowadays, everyone seems to be talking about stress. You hear it not only in daily conversation, but also through television, radio, the newspapers and the constantly increasing number of conferences, stress centres, and university courses that are devoted to the topic… The businessman thinks of it as frustration or emotional tension, the air traffic controller as a problem in concentration, the biochemist and endocrinologist as a purely chemical event, the athlete as muscular tension. This list could be extended to almost every human experience or activity, and somewhat surprisingly, most people… think of their own occupation as being the most stressful. Similarly, most of us believe that ours is “the age of stress”, forgetting that the caveman’s fear of being attacked by wild animals while he slept, or dying from hunger, cold, or exhaustion, must have been just as stressful as our fear of a world war, the crash of the stock exchange, overpopulation or the unpredictability of the future.”

– Hans Selye (1907 – 1983, cited in Walker, Burnham, & Borland, 1994, p704).

Walker, M., Burnham, D., & Borland, R. (1994) Psychology, 2nd Edition. John Wiley & Sons.